Asia in Depth Series

Please mark your calendars for this series of talks in which scholars approaching China from various fields will introduce their new work to the Georgetown campus and community. The series is offered by the Georgetown Initiative for Global History and the Asian Studies Program at Georgetown, with support from the Offices of the Provost and the Vice President for Global Engagement.

All talks (unless otherwise advertised) held on Thursdays from 5:00-7:00 p.m. in Intercultural Center (ICC) room 662 on the Georgetown University campus.

Please contact Prof. James Millward for more information. If you wish to be added to the seminar's email list, please email guhistory@georgetown.edu.

2016-2017

September 15
Max Oidtmann, Georgetown University
"Qing Colonialism, Reincarnation, and the Reformulation of Tibetan Legal Culture"

October 28 (Friday)
Fuchsia Dunlop (Food writer and photographer)
Speaking about her new book Land of Fish and Rice

November 9 (Wednesday)
Andrew Schonebaum, University of Maryland
"Medicine and Vernacular Knowledge in Early Modern China"

December 5- CANCELLED
Harold Roth, Brown University
"Cognitive Attunement in the Zhuangzi"

We regret to announce that Harold Roth's talk in the Asia in Depth series, scheduled for Dec. 5th, has been cancelled.  The next Asia in Depth talk will be that of Joanne Sunglim Kim, on January 26th.

January 26
Joanne Sunglim Kim, Dartmouth College
"Dalliances with Objects: Aspiration and Inspiration in the Art of Late Chosŏn Korea"

February 23
Terry Kleeman, University of Colorado
"Of Parishes and Priests: The Rise and Fall of Communal Daoism in Medieval China"

March 23
Kaiser Kuo
"China Online: A 20 Year Retrospective"

April 28
Yukio Lippit, Harvard University
"Japanese Emaki 絵巻 and Narrative Theory"

2015-2016

Thursday, October 8, 2:30-4:00 in ICC 662
Michael Goebel, Free University, Berlin
discusses his new book, Anti-Imperial Metropolis: Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

Tuesday, November 17, 6:00-7:30pm
Sophie de Schaepdrijver, Pennsylvania State University
“The German Occupation of Belgium during the First World War”

Tuesday, March 1, 6:00-7:30pm
Ruth Ben-Ghiat, New York University
“Italian Prisoners of War, 1940-1950: What We Learn from Studying Defeat”

Thursday, March 17, 6:30-8:00pm
Max Paul Friedman, American University
“Containing the New Empire: Latin American Strategies against U.S. Hegemony in the Early Twentieth Century”

2015-2016

September 22
Madeleine Yue Dong, University of Washington, Seattle
"Looking for 'China' in Qing History"

Madeleine Yue Dong is Professor of History in the Department of History and the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle.  She is the author of Republican Beijing: The City and Its Histories (University of California Press, 2003), co-editor of Everyday Modernity in China (University of Washington Press, 2006), and The Modern Girl Around the World (Duke University Press, 2008), editor of Beyond Area Studies: An Anthology of Western Scholarship on Modern Chinese History, (CASS Press, Beijing, 2013.  She is currently working on a book manuscript, Out of the Wilderness: Writing Histories of the Qing Dynasty.
RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/looking-for-china-in-qing-history-tickets-18537495147

October 20
Adam Brookes
"Terra Very Bloody Incognita: Some Random Thoughts on Portraying China in Journalism and Commercial Fiction"

Adam Brookes is an award-winning foreign correspondent and the author of the novels ‘Spy Games’ (2015) and ‘Night Heron’ (2014) published by Little, Brown. For many years, he reported for BBC News from Washington, DC on American politics and the economy, with a special interest in defense and security stories. 
Before moving to Washington, Adam was the BBC’s Beijing Correspondent, based in China for six years. His first foreign posting for the BBC was to Indonesia as Jakarta Correspondent. He has covered the wars in Afghanistan and in Iraq and has reported on assignment from many other countries including North Korea and Mongolia. He has been a regular panelist at events for senior officers of the US military, presenting on journalism and international affairs. 
Adam holds a B.A. in Chinese from the University of London. He and his family live in Takoma Park, Maryland. He is currently writing a third novel, and starting work on a piece of Chinese historical non-fiction. 
RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/terra-very-bloody-incognita-some-random-thoughts-on-portraying-china-in-journalism-and-commercial-tickets-18538029746

December 15
Roberta Wue, University of California, Irvine
"Butchers and Vendors: Portraits of the Artist in Late Qing Shanghai"

Roberta Wue is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of California, Irvine.  Her research focuses on art, visual culture, and photography in nineteenth-century Qing China, with a particular interest in the rhetoric of the modern Chinese image and its relationships with its viewers.  She is the author of Art Worlds: Artists, Images, and Audiences in Late Nineteenth-century Shanghai (Hong Kong University Press & University of Hawai’i Press, 2015); other publications include essays on photography, painting, and art advertising in Ars Orientalis, Art Bulletin and Late Imperial China.
RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/butchers-and-vendors-portraits-of-the-artist-in-late-qing-shanghai-tickets-18538164148

January 25
Harold Roth, Brown University

"Cognitive Attunement in the Zhuangzi"
Harold D. Roth is professor of religious studies and founding director of the contemplative studies initiative at Brown University. He is a specialist in classical Chinese philosophy and textual analysis, the Daoist tradition, the comparative study of contemplative practices and results, and a pioneer of the academic field of contemplative studies, in which he created the first undergraduate concentration program at a major research university in North America. He has published six books and more than 50 scholarly articles in these area including Original Tao (Columbia, 1999), a translation and analysis of the oldest text on breath meditation in China, and “Against Cognitive Imperialism” (Religion East and West, 2008), a critique of conceptual bias in Cognitive Sciences and Religious Studies. He has been the recipient of grants and fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange.
RSVP: https://zhuangzi.eventbrite.com

February 23
Joel Andreas, Johns Hopkins University

"The Brief, Tumultuous History of “Big Democracy” in China’s Factories"
Joel Andreas is Associate Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University.  He studies political contention and social change in contemporary China. His book, Rise of the Red Engineers: The Cultural Revolution and the Origins of China’s New Class (Stanford, 2009), analyzes the contentious process through which old and new elites coalesced during the decades following the 1949 Communist Revolution. He is currently investigating changing labor relations in Chinese factories between 1949 and the present, as well as recent changes in agrarian society.
Additional info: http://bigdemocracy.eventbrite.com 

March 22
Becky Hsu, Georgetown University

“The Good Death: Present-Day Rituals, Blessed Happiness, and Family Lineage”
Becky Hsu is assistant professor of sociology at Georgetown University. Her research interests include China, religion, organizations, global aid and development. Becky is currently completing an ethnography on global development and interpretive framing, based on fieldwork on NGOs in rural China. She is also investigating how people define happiness in China today. She has published articles on microfinance, how to estimate the number of Muslims worldwide, international religion data methodology, religion and economic development, and faith-based organizations in the British Journal of Sociology, Journal of Development Studies, Social Science Quarterly, the Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion, the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, and the International Scope Review. She received a B.A. in Sociology with 'cum laude' and distinction in the major from Yale University, M.A. with distinction and PhD from the sociology department at Princeton University.
Additional info: http://gooddeath.eventbrite.com 

April 15
Raina Huntington, University of Wisconsin, Madison

"Maps for Splendid Journeys: The Board Games of Yu Yue (1821-1907)"
Rania Huntington is associate professor of Chinese Literature in the department of East Asian Languages and Literature at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She received her doctorate from Harvard University in 1996. Her research interests focus on Ming and Qing dynasty narrative and drama, particularly the themes of memory and the supernatural. Representative publications include: Alien Kind: Foxes and Late Imperial Chinese Narrative (Harvard University Asia Center, 2003); “Ghosts Seeking Substitutes: Female Suicide and Repetition” (Late Imperial China 26.1); “Memory, Mourning, and Genre in the Works of Yu Yue” (Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 67.2); “The View from the Tower of Crossing Sails: Ji Yun’s Female Informants” (Nannü 12.1); and “The Captive’s Revenge: the Taiping Civil War as Drama” (Late Imperial China 35.2.) https://www.eventbrite.com/e/maps-for-splendid-journeys-the-board-games-of-yu-yue-1821-1907-tickets-19502307928

2014-2015

September 18
Evan Osnos, China correspondent for The New Yorker, 2008-2013
"China in the Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith."
From abroad, we often see China as a caricature: a nation of pragmatic plutocrats and ruthlessly dedicated students destined to rule the global economy—or an addled Goliath, riddled with corruption and on the edge of stagnation. What we don’t see is how both powerful and ordinary people are remaking their lives as their country dramatically changes. As the Beijing correspondent for The New Yorker, Evan Osnos was on the ground in China for years, witness to profound political, economic, and cultural upheaval. In his book Age of Ambition, he describes the greatest collision taking place in that country: the clash between the rise of the individual and the Communist Party’s struggle to retain control. Osnos follows the moving stories of everyday people and reveals life in the new China to be a battleground between aspiration and authoritarianism.

October 21
Erin Cline, Georgetown University, Department of Theology
"Families of Virtue: Why Chinese Philosophy Matters for Contemporary Public Policy and Social Change."

A set of distinctive and fascinating theories concerning the unique and irreplaceable role of parent-child relationships during infancy and early childhood are found in the work of some of the most influential Chinese Confucian philosophers. These philosophers argue that the general ethical sensibilities we begin to develop during infancy and early childhood—and even during the prenatal period—are the basis for nearly every virtue and that parent-child relationships are the primary context within which this early moral cultivation occurs. They describe how and why parent-child relationships provide a foundation for our moral development and contend that early childhood development and cultivation within the family is not simply a private or purely ethical matter; it has a direct and observable impact on the quality of a society. In this talk, Erin Cline examines the reasoning of early Confucian philosophers on these matters and argues that they deserve the attention of policymakers and of all who wish to raise flourishing children today. In addition to highlighting the distinctive features of Confucian views on this topic (compared with the views of Western philosophers), she puts Confucian views into conversation with the best empirical work on early childhood in the social sciences. Drawing upon an extensive body of research in the social sciences that supports and can help us to further develop some of the central tenets of ancient Confucian views concerning parent-child relationships, Cline seeks to renew and strengthen ancient Chinese philosophy for our own times, arguing that many of the views and specific practices advocated by Confucian philosophers are defensible and worth developing in a contemporary setting.

November 18
Matt Sommer, Stanford University, Department of History
"Polyandry and Wife Sale in Qing Dynasty China"

In China during the Qing dynasty (1644-1912), polyandry and wife sale were widespread survival strategies practiced by the rural poor in conditions of overpopulation, shrinking farm sizes, and worsening sex ratios. Polyandry involved bringing in an outside, single male to help support a family in exchange for sharing the wife; wife sale involved the transfer of a woman from one husband to another, to become the latter's wife, in exchange for cash payment. These two practices represented opposite ends of a spectrum of strategies to mobilize the sexual and reproductive labor of women in order to supplement household incomes and maintain subsistence. If we take into account lived experience among the poor, no clear distinction can be drawn between marriage and the traffic in women in Qing China; similarly, the normative distinction between marriage and sex work that was basic to law and elite ideology cannot be sustained.

January 15
Jessica Teets, Middlebury College, Political Science Department
"Civil Society under Authoritarianism: the China Model"

Despite the dominant narrative of the repression of civil society in China, Jessica Teets argues that interactions between local officials and civil society facilitate a learning process, whereby each actor learns about the intentions and work processes of the other. Over the past two decades, often facilitated by foreign donors and problems within the general social framework, these interactions generated a process in which officials learned the benefits and disadvantages of civil society. Civil society supports local officials' efforts to provide social services and improve public policies, yet it also engages in protest and other activities that challenge social stability and development. This duality motivates local officials in China to construct a “social management” system – known as consultative authoritarianism – to encourage the beneficial aspects and discourage the dangerous ones. Although civil society has not democratized China, such organizations have facilitated greater dialogue between citizens and state as part of politics in an authoritarian system that normally lacks such channels for participation.

February 12
Michael Puett, Harvard University, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
“Ritual Substitutions: Theories of Ritual from Classical China”

March 17
Tsering Shakya, Canadian Research Chair in Religion and Contemporary Society in Asia at the I 3 nstitute for Asian Research, University of British Columbia
"Why the Golden Urn? Qing use of the Trulku Selection System in 18th Century Tibet and Mongolia"
In 1792 Emperor Qianlong introduced the Golden Urn (Lottery) system for the selection of high ranking Tibetan and Mongolian Trulkus, (reincarnate lamas). Recently, the PRC government used the Golden Urn for the selection of the 11th Panchen Lama in order to demonstrate China’s claims of sovereignty over Tibet. Most studies focus on when the Golden Urn method was used; in this talk, Tsering Shakya will examine the reason why this method of selection was used.

April 16
Tian Xiaofei, Harvard University, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
“‘Poetry as Evidence’: Fragmentation of Self and Discourse in the Nineteenth Century.”

May 7
Special Event for the Georgetown China-studies community
Stay tuned!